Moving Between Precedent and Dependent Cells

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Using keyboard shortcuts

To move to a precedent cell(s):

Select a cell containing a formula and press Ctrl+[.
The Ctrl+[ shortcut is one of the most important keyboard shortcuts, and is highly recommended.
It can trace a precedent cell(s) in the active sheet, in another sheet in the workbook, or in a sheet in another open workbook, and it can open a closed workbook and select the precedent cell(s) after opening.

Using the mouse

Add three icons to the Standard toolbar:

Trace Precedents
Trace Dependents
Remove All Arrows

To add an icon to the toolbar:

1. Right-click a toolbar, and then select Customize from the shortcut menu.
2. Select the Commands tab, and from Categories, select Tools.
3. Drag the three icons from the Commands area to the Standard toolbar and close the Customize dialog box.

To use the Trace Precedents or Trace Dependents icons to move between linked cells in the same sheet:

1. Type a number into cell A1 and then type the formula =A1 into cell D1.
2. Select cell D1 and click Trace Precedents. Double-click the blue arrow between the cells to move between the precedent cell and the dependent cell.

To use the Trace Precedents and Trace Dependents icons to move between linked cells outside the sheet:
1. Insert a link formula =[Book1.xls]Sheet1!$A$1 into cell A1 in an open workbook.
2. Select cell A1 in the new workbook and click Trace Precedents. Double-click the dotted-line arrow to open the Go To dialog box, select the address, and then click

To move to a precedent cell:

1. From the Tools menu, select Options.
2. Select the Edit tab, and deselect the Edit directly in cell checkbox.
3. Select a cell with a linked formula and double click it to move to a precedent cell.

To return to the last four selected addresses:

The Go To dialog box holds the last four references moved to via Go To.
Press F5 to open the Go To dialog box (the last step is shown in the Reference box). Check the address and click OK.
Screenshot // Moving Between Precedent and Dependent Cells
Moving Between Precedent and Dependent CellsMoving Between Precedent and Dependent CellsMoving Between Precedent and Dependent Cells

Moving Between Precedent and Dependent Cells



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